historical-nonfiction:

Tomoe Gozen, female samurai and badass. 
lived from around 1157 to 1247
fought in the Genpei War (1180–1185)
the only historical account of her is the The Tale of Heike, an epic retelling of the struggle for supremacy between the Taira and Minamoto clans in the war
however, her grave and one of her handmaiden’s graves exist today, so she was probably real
Tomoe was described as extremely beautiful (of course)
a superb archer and swordswoman, both riding and on foot
was “a warrior worth a thousand”
she also rode unbroken horses down cliffs!

historical-nonfiction:

Tomoe Gozen, female samurai and badass. 

  • lived from around 1157 to 1247
  • fought in the Genpei War (1180–1185)
  • the only historical account of her is the The Tale of Heike, an epic retelling of the struggle for supremacy between the Taira and Minamoto clans in the war
  • however, her grave and one of her handmaiden’s graves exist today, so she was probably real
  • Tomoe was described as extremely beautiful (of course)
  • a superb archer and swordswoman, both riding and on foot
  • was “a warrior worth a thousand”
  • she also rode unbroken horses down cliffs!
phototoartguy:

Wildlife photographer Hank Perry had his patience rewarded when he captured this candid shot of a grizzly bear sow and her triplet cubs - after a four hour stand-off to win her trust.
Picture: Hank Perry/Solent News

Grizzly bears are amazing.

phototoartguy:

Wildlife photographer Hank Perry had his patience rewarded when he captured this candid shot of a grizzly bear sow and her triplet cubs - after a four hour stand-off to win her trust.

Picture: Hank Perry/Solent News

Grizzly bears are amazing.

(via mucholderthen)

stonerthings:

Four piece metal grinder giveaway!
To enter: -must be following me (I will check) -reblog this photo, likes don’t count
I’ll be announcing the winner at 4:20 central time on Wednesday
Good luck and stay high 😎

Gotta stay high :P *w*

stonerthings:

Four piece metal grinder giveaway!

To enter:
-must be following me (I will check)
-reblog this photo, likes don’t count

I’ll be announcing the winner at 4:20 central time on Wednesday

Good luck and stay high 😎

Gotta stay high :P *w*

mucholderthen:

Harvard discovers three of its library books are bound in human flesh

As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research. Waste not, want not, I suppose.

(Posted at Roadtrippers by Greg Newkirk / 31 March, 2014)
mucholderthen:

Harvard discovers three of its library books are bound in human flesh

As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research. Waste not, want not, I suppose.

(Posted at Roadtrippers by Greg Newkirk / 31 March, 2014)
mucholderthen:

Harvard discovers three of its library books are bound in human flesh

As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research. Waste not, want not, I suppose.

(Posted at Roadtrippers by Greg Newkirk / 31 March, 2014)

mucholderthen:

Harvard discovers three of its library books are bound in human flesh

As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research. Waste not, want not, I suppose.

(Posted at Roadtrippers by Greg Newkirk / 31 March, 2014)

biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit
Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.
She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.
Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.
Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

"Impersonating a man", indeed. Pshaw! Our society better keep changing. biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit
Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.
She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.
Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.
Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

"Impersonating a man", indeed. Pshaw! Our society better keep changing. biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit
Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.
She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.
Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.
Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

"Impersonating a man", indeed. Pshaw! Our society better keep changing. biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit
Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.
She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.
Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.
Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

"Impersonating a man", indeed. Pshaw! Our society better keep changing.

biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit

Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.

She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.

Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.

Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

"Impersonating a man", indeed. Pshaw! Our society better keep changing.

(via biomedicalephemera)

historical-nonfiction:

Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin. Hollywood, 1919

historical-nonfiction:

Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin. Hollywood, 1919

art-of-swords:

Knightly Sword
Dated: 12th century
Culture: European
Measurements: overall length 102 cm (40 inches)
The sword has a straight, double-edged blade, the edges almost parallel for half of the length, then slightly converging, with a fuller on almost the entire length.

Source: Copyright 2014 © Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

art-of-swords:

Knightly Sword
Dated: 12th century
Culture: European
Measurements: overall length 102 cm (40 inches)
The sword has a straight, double-edged blade, the edges almost parallel for half of the length, then slightly converging, with a fuller on almost the entire length.

Source: Copyright 2014 © Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

art-of-swords:

Knightly Sword
Dated: 12th century
Culture: European
Measurements: overall length 102 cm (40 inches)
The sword has a straight, double-edged blade, the edges almost parallel for half of the length, then slightly converging, with a fuller on almost the entire length.

Source: Copyright 2014 © Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

art-of-swords:

Knightly Sword
Dated: 12th century
Culture: European
Measurements: overall length 102 cm (40 inches)
The sword has a straight, double-edged blade, the edges almost parallel for half of the length, then slightly converging, with a fuller on almost the entire length.

Source: Copyright 2014 © Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

art-of-swords:

Knightly Sword

  • Dated: 12th century
  • Culture: European
  • Measurements: overall length 102 cm (40 inches)

The sword has a straight, double-edged blade, the edges almost parallel for half of the length, then slightly converging, with a fuller on almost the entire length.

Source: Copyright 2014 © Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

mucholderthen:

New infographic by illustrator/designer on Tumblr compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!
Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap  [for PDF]

Read more about the graphic.
View or download a larger version [png] …

mucholderthen:

New infographic by illustrator/designer on Tumblr compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!

Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap  [for PDF]

Read more about the graphic.

View or download a larger version [png] …

oldbookillustrations:

And Guinivere stood by the castle walls to watch him pass. 
Henry Sandham, from The idylls of the king (in shorthand), by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Montreal, 1889.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

And Guinivere stood by the castle walls to watch him pass.

Henry Sandham, from The idylls of the king (in shorthand), by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Montreal, 1889.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

The stream Full, narrow; this a bridge of single arc Took at a leap.
Henry Sandham, from The idylls of the king (in shorthand), by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Montreal, 1889.
(Source: archive.org)

Looks like a bridge from a fantasy world… the face in the middle watches you.

oldbookillustrations:

The stream
Full, narrow; this a bridge of single arc
Took at a leap.

Henry Sandham, from The idylls of the king (in shorthand), by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Montreal, 1889.

(Source: archive.org)

Looks like a bridge from a fantasy world… the face in the middle watches you.

wtfarthistory:

Game of Thrones animals of house sigils from medieval manuscripts: Baratheon, Stark, Targaryen, Lannister (Bestiary, Book of the Hunt, Apocalypse, and Physiologus, respectively)

Reblogging for the cool art. wtfarthistory:

Game of Thrones animals of house sigils from medieval manuscripts: Baratheon, Stark, Targaryen, Lannister (Bestiary, Book of the Hunt, Apocalypse, and Physiologus, respectively)

Reblogging for the cool art. wtfarthistory:

Game of Thrones animals of house sigils from medieval manuscripts: Baratheon, Stark, Targaryen, Lannister (Bestiary, Book of the Hunt, Apocalypse, and Physiologus, respectively)

Reblogging for the cool art. wtfarthistory:

Game of Thrones animals of house sigils from medieval manuscripts: Baratheon, Stark, Targaryen, Lannister (Bestiary, Book of the Hunt, Apocalypse, and Physiologus, respectively)

Reblogging for the cool art.

wtfarthistory:

Game of Thrones animals of house sigils from medieval manuscripts: Baratheon, Stark, Targaryen, Lannister (Bestiary, Book of the Hunt, Apocalypse, and Physiologus, respectively)

Reblogging for the cool art.

(via artofthedarkages)

artofthedarkages:

“Floor Mosaic from Hisham’s Palace”
An extraordinarily detailed floor mosaic in the baths of an Umayyad palace with a circular design, ribbon pattern, and oculus. Most likely emulating a mosque ceiling.
Pieced together out of colored tesserae.
Made in the 700s by the caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik near Jericho in the West Bank. Currently located in situ.

On a floor! Beautiful, amazing craftsmanship, and trippy.

artofthedarkages:

Floor Mosaic from Hisham’s Palace

An extraordinarily detailed floor mosaic in the baths of an Umayyad palace with a circular design, ribbon pattern, and oculus. Most likely emulating a mosque ceiling.

Pieced together out of colored tesserae.

Made in the 700s by the caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik near Jericho in the West Bank. Currently located in situ.

On a floor! Beautiful, amazing craftsmanship, and trippy.


zerostatereflex:
Banana MRI  //  Source unknown

I wonder why it looks like this?

zerostatereflex:

Banana MRI  //  Source unknown

I wonder why it looks like this?

(via mucholderthen)

theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Ooh… this person is an amazing artist. The talent and hard work is blowing me away. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Ooh… this person is an amazing artist. The talent and hard work is blowing me away. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Ooh… this person is an amazing artist. The talent and hard work is blowing me away. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Ooh… this person is an amazing artist. The talent and hard work is blowing me away. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Ooh… this person is an amazing artist. The talent and hard work is blowing me away. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Ooh… this person is an amazing artist. The talent and hard work is blowing me away.

theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Ooh… this person is an amazing artist. The talent and hard work is blowing me away.

theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Love the weirdness. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Love the weirdness. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Love the weirdness. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Love the weirdness. theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Love the weirdness.

theartofanimation:

Miles Johnston

Love the weirdness.